VoiceReallyMatters.com

A layperson’s exploration of all things voice

Category Archives: Marketing Use

May 25, 2021

Analyzing Customer Interactions to Glean Customer Preferences

Here’s a teaser from the “Rain” agency about their weekly note:

Millions of calls are answered in call centers per day, generating conversations rife with insights into customer behaviors and preferences. This week, we take a look into how companies are analyzing conversations to enhance the customer experience. Voice technology companies like Observe.AI and CallMiner are deploying tools that analyze the interactions (including sentiment and even silences) between customers and call center representatives, providing recommendations on how these employees can improve their service.

With information on what a customer is searching for, brands like Spotify and Amazon are hoping to personalize content in real time — setting the stage for how conversation analysis might be used in phone calls, voice experiences, and more to elevate marketing.

April 20, 2021

Analyzing Voice Sentiment With Spotify’s Coming Tech

Here is a note from the “Rain” agency:

Voice is a natural channel for conveying our emotions and feelings. However, voice technology is still trying to crack analyzing sentiment and how these data points can inform the creation of emotionally intelligent voice experiences and assistants. We have seen voice assistants like Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant expand their speaking styles to include different emotions in certain responses, reflecting more humanlike interactions.

However, monitoring emotions on the consumer side is still a nascent technology. Amazon has made some steps toward realizing this with its health and wellness wearable Halo, which tracks users’ tone through their voices to make them more aware of their communication styles. This week, we’ve seen a new update in emotion recognition with Spotify’s patent approval of technology that analyzes listeners’ moods. Even though the patent only points to a small amount of features and a targeted use case, we are beginning to see how voice technology might leverage sentiment to provide more relevant recommendations and experiences for consumers in many contexts.

April 8, 2021

Wikipedia to Start Charging Voice Assistants for Data Access

Here’s the intro from this voicebot.ai article:

Voice assistants may soon need to pay Wikipedia to find answers to some of the questions users pose. The Wikimedia Foundation, the umbrella organization that encompasses Wikipedia and its sibling wiki-projects, is launching Wikimedia Enterprise to start packaging and selling Wikipedia’s content to Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google, including their respective voice assistants, as first reported by Wired.

November 23, 2020

Nearly Half of Consumers Want Voice in Their Apps

Here’s the intro from this Voicebot article:

Voicebot’s biannual Smartphone Voice Assistant Consumer Adoption Report considered new questions in 2020 around consumer interest in and experience with voice interaction within mobile apps. A key finding is that consumers have strong interest in voice interactivity within mobile apps and more experience with these features than many people realize. Just over 45% of consumers said they would “very much” or that “it would be nice” to have voice assistant features within their favorite mobile apps. This figure compares to just 25% that said they were not interested.

October 6, 2020

WalMart Launches Own Voice Assistant (For Employees Initially)

Here’s the intro from this TechCrunch story:

Walmart is expanding its use of voice technology. The company announced today its taking its employee assistance voice technology dubbed “Ask Sam” and making it available to associates at over 5,000 Walmart stores nationwide. The tool allows Walmart employees to look up prices, access store maps, find products, view sales information, check email and more. In recent months, Ask Sam has also been used to access COVID-19 information, including the latest guidelines, guidance and safety videos.

Ask Sam was initially developed for use in Walmart-owned Sam’s Club stores, where it rolled out across the U.S. in 2019. Because of its use of voice tech, Ask Sam can speed up the time it takes to get to information versus typing a query on the small screen. This allows employees to better engage with customers instead of spending time on their device looking for information.

July 29, 2020

How Artificial Intelligence Can Boost Marketing Efforts

This Forbes article is about artificial intelligence, not voice – but I found it compelling. And a little bit scary. Anytime I read about how you can so easily manipulate the content in videos – the “deep fake” – it frightens me. Although I guess that should be the least of my worries these days. Here’s the ending from the piece:

These examples show that artificial intelligence, when used creatively, can do more than the grunt work. It is a way to build relationships with customers on a personal level while at the same time scaling at large in a cost-effective way. It’s important to go beyond equating AI to only chatbots and have conversations around how AI can actually work in service of brands and, in turn, be used to better their customer’s experience.

We should continue to have meaningful discussions around deepfakes and setting up safeguards and ethics around synthetic media. But, we must also move the conversation beyond just focusing on that element of synthetic media. It’s also time for brands and businesses to better understand the broader trends that are on the horizon, so they are prepared for the future of marketing to come.

May 7, 2020

Using Audioburst to Conduct Voice Searches of Podcasts & Talk Radio

This Voicebot.ai podcast provides ten short interviews from the CES conference. At the 4:28 mark, Bret Kinsella talks to Audioburst’s Gal Klein. Audioburst helps with the discovery problem inherent in audio by extracting the relevant bits from podcasts and talk radio in response to what you’re looking for. This TechCrunch article helps to explain how that works (as well as Bret’s interview with Gal).