VoiceReallyMatters.com

A layperson’s exploration of all things voice

March 2, 2020

The Mayo Clinic’s Voice Experience as a First Mover

This Voicebot.ai podcast with the Mayo Clinic’s Dr. Sandhya Pruthi and Joyce Even is interesting for those helping their organizations get into voice because the Mayo Clinic was a first mover and these speakers share some details about how they got started. The points include:

1. The Mayo Clinic is a content-driven organization. It was already involved in educating the public & medical staff through multiple mediums, including chat bots.

2. They started with a first aid skill to try it out. And since then, they’ve been constantly been building on that. They didn’t start with a concrete plan, just generally going with the flow. Taking content built for Web or print and converting it for voice is an art & science. Shorter answers required and the need to predict how a question will be asked.

3. Conducted a pilot where patients would be instructed by nurses after the doctor was done with them that they could ask a voice assistant about wound care upon discharge. An example of how you can use a patient’s “down time” when they are alone back in a room to get more educated about their condition. Highly successful from both the medical staff and patient’s perspective. Now they’re planning on rolling out a pilot for the emergency room.

4. The speakers noted that some patients are either loathe to ask their doctor certain questions (eg. they worry they would look stupid to ask or due to privacy concerns) or they forget their questions when the doctor comes in. Oftentimes, the family also has a lot of questions. The voice assistant can help with efficiency & education.

5. Amazon asked Mayo Clinic to provide first-party content (ie. content that is part of Alexa’s core; you don’t have to ask for Alexa to open a Mayo Clinic skill). That took some work to convert the third-party content they had developed into first person content.

6. A content team leads voice at the Mayo Clinic. Bret remarked that’s unusual as it typically is a team from marketing, product or IT.

7. The Mayo Clinic voice doesn’t have a persona. They eventually may have one – or maybe even multiple personas depending on the type of interaction (eg. audience is particular type of patients, their own doctors, etc.) – but it may be unnecessary and they won’t do that. Still early days.

8. The Mayo Clinic has a digital strategy that stretches out to 2030. A few possibilities about how voice may evolve are interactions with a voice app that is empathetic (eg. it will get to really know you & can cater to your needs); voice apps that are more proactive by reaching out & being more engaged (eg. “did you take your meds?”); and freeing up providers to be more efficient by dramatically cutting down on the four hrs they spend per day doing medical records today.